Inspiring Leader : Sir Richard Branson

Inspiring Leader : Sir Richard Branson

Two weeks ago I had the chance to attend at Dreamforce 2012 in San Francisco. What a great event ! This time, I will not talk about the Cloud, some Social Computing Revolution or what inovation trends. I will just talk about leadership, if I can, with Sir Richard Branson exchange with Marc Benioff. Few things I caught I want to share with you. In fact I have three main points. People, Try and Go. People. Trust people, your team. They worth it ! Sir Branson value the respect you need to have with your teams. “I love my team” he said. Who can’t share these values ? Try. You can’t succeed without trying something. Try, try, may be fail but try ! “Give entrepreneurial loans instead of money”. Entrepreneurship is in the hart of his life with more than 300 companies (!) in different sectors that’s an amazing point. Go. Life is short. Don’t live the life others expected for you to live. You have a passion ? Live it ! Virgin is an “Amazing way of life” for Sir Branson. You can find it in records, air lines, mobiles and so on… Do you think you have a lot of time ? Just to share with you these thrre personal points Sir Richard Branson shared. I found a deep humility… after 45 years of success. Many thanks for this Sir....
Cloud Computing: The death of the Tier IV Datacenter

Cloud Computing: The death of the Tier IV Datacenter

Following various discussions on what the cloud will change, I offer the view that we shared with Frederick Coeuille (CTO AcierNet).  For your datacenter? Cloud Computing, it changes something? We want to check our bank accounts when we want, look at our emails at any time and anywhere in particular. To interact, chat, videos, share files at any time … The availability requirements and therefore systems continuity is becoming stronger. It conditions the systems from start to finish to deliver these services every day, all the time. What about your datacenter? Ever more demanding. Increased levels of redundancy, complex architectures to cope with any breakdowns. The datacenters today range from Tier I to Tier IV to ensure, as indicated by the Uptime Institute, ranging from availability of 99.671% (Tier I) to 99.995% (Tier IV). And if this race was a lost race for availability? And if the cloud had to answer different in design while ensuring a seamless availability? The death of the Tier IV Datacenter is close! Several points to support my point, why watch the Datacenter as a receptacle without intelligence as new technologies allow a dialogue between infrastructure (servers) and the building? Why legitimize large investments with multiple 2N +1 static redundancies  in the case of a Tier IV when a real N dynamics’ one provide a superior level of service associated with a communication layer between the building, IT and virtualization. In addition, a financial standpoint, this approach would allow substantial savings by reducing at least by 25% the Datacenter’s budget as a whole. This equation is not just for the building but also for network and servers. It would benefit to redesign these new vessels of communication, denser, more efficient, cleaner, safer, in a word...
Cloud Computing Architected : Solutions for Application Design with John Rhoton

Cloud Computing Architected : Solutions for Application Design with John Rhoton

Exchanging with some key people in the Cloud area is very exiting. Today, I want to share with you my conversation with John Rhoton about his last book. Your first book about Cloud Computing (Cloud Computing Explained) was very thorough. What prompted you to write again on a similar topic? The books target very different requirements. The first focuses on how to integrate existing cloud services into the enterprise and leverage them to create new capabilities or improve existing business processes. The second looks at how to create new software and services that leverage cloud computing and can be delivered through cloud-related channels. Cloud Computing Explained caters to IT managers and CIOs who are considering cloud computing for their enterprise.  It provides a high-level overview of the technology and then leads the reader through the process of assessing the suitability of a cloud-based approach for a given situation. This involves calculating and justifying the investment and developing a solid design that considers the implementation along with the ongoing operations and governance that are required to keep the system running. However, cloud computing is also of interest to many other stakeholders, such as service providers, users and technologists. In Cloud Computing Architected, Risto Haukioja and I look at cloud computing from the vantage point of a software architect who is developing applications that could potentially be hosted in the cloud. This perspective focuses first on how to use cloud-based platforms and services in developing new software. It then explains what is needed in order to make the code “cloud-ready” so that it can scale on demand and accommodate higher resource efficiencies,...
What Cloud Will Change For ? #4 : Renaud Brosse, A Sourcing Perspective

What Cloud Will Change For ? #4 : Renaud Brosse, A Sourcing Perspective

Following the third post on this topic by Kwame Yamgnane, with A practical implementation perspective on what Cloud Computing will change, Let me introduce this fourth post. “What Cloud Computing will change for ?…” Thanks Renaud ! Is there a change? Cloud computing is well beyond the “buzzword” or slide ware the stage. It will definitely have a large impact on every player in the IT game – end users & customers, business users, service providers, telcos, software vendors, IS shops & IT professionals. The benefits are just too great to be ignored. What kind of change ? Obviously, the changes (opportunities & threats) will differ vastly depending on the players. In 2010, Cloud computing has been adopted mostly by small & medium sized-organizations who saw immediate benefits in the speed of delivery, low entry costs, full-fledged service, time to market provided by SaaS. Larger enterprises are still in the « early adopters » stage. The more entrepreneurial or risk-prone ones have started implementing IaaS, usually for non-mission critical compute/storage clouds or email/unified communications, and a few select, low-criticality, low-integration applications such as CRM, marketing, collaboration or event-related web or video sites. If the projects where Timspirit is involved are any hint, 2011 will definitely see growing « tactical » adoption of IaaS and to a lesser extent SaaS or PaaS by large enterprises, with two main triggers : the need for new infrastructures for new application projects , and the renewal of existing infrastructure hosting/outsourcing contracts. We think that private internal clouds will never really appear : most companies lack the skills, resources, long-terme investment capabilities to build...
What Cloud will change for ? #3 : A practical implementation perspective by Kwame Yamgnane

What Cloud will change for ? #3 : A practical implementation perspective by Kwame Yamgnane

Following the second post on this topic by Jérémy Fain, with an Innovative perspective on what Cloud Computing will change, Let me introduce this third post. “What Cloud Computing will change for ?…” Thanks Kwame ! Is there a change ? EPITECH, as a school for computer science, got a real culture around “do it yourself”. Now, we started to change, because our business is changing. We can no longer focus our power on IT Services which has no “business necessity” but just is a commodity. For the first time this year, students’ emails are no longer at EPITECH but in the Cloud on the live@edu service hosted by Microsoft. What kind of change? EPITECH as classified its services in three groups. First group is the “completely under control” services, such as email, web, VOIP… For the second, “new technologies”, you must understand that as a first ranked IT School, EPITECH use a lot of technologies that as just triggered from labs which are the second group such as HD audio & video conferencing system, Epitech Innovative Project or EPITECH Labs for Innovation support… And the third one, represents “nowhere else services” which are completely specific to our business like our students and alumni management system. We consider that only the first group services “completely under control” is eligible to Cloud Computing, and we start to move. For the second group, “new technologies”, those technologies should join to the first group in few months or years. A number of those technologies we are trying will disappear and we don’t want to manage a change from internal to Cloud for...
What Cloud Computing will change for ? #2 : An Innovative Company perspective by Jérémy Fain

What Cloud Computing will change for ? #2 : An Innovative Company perspective by Jérémy Fain

Following the first post by Sylvain Pendaries, with a CIO perspective on what Cloud Computing will change, I am very proud to introduce this second post. “What Cloud Computing will change for ?…” Thanks to Jérémy ! An innovative Company perspective by Jérémy Fain. What will Cloud Computing change for you ? Verteego is an online environmental performance applications vendor. In other words, we provide software-as-a-service (SaaS) to help businesses go green by, for instance, monitoring their Greenhouse Gas emissions, or tracking hazardous chemicals in their supply chain. We basically are a pure player in the Cloud Computing space. Verteego wouldn’t exist as it is without the very notion of Cloud Computing, and Cloud Computing software pioneers such as SalesForce or NetSuite. So, Cloud Computing is not really a change driver for Verteego, but more of an enabler: the more Cloud Computing becomes a mainstream architecture within corporations, the easier it will be for Verteego to be deployed worldwide by global organizations who want to better the environment and their bottom line. Is there a change ? I believe Cloud Computing in itself represents both a cultural change and a technology challenge. What kind ? A cultural change because CIOs have to redefine the way information is structured: the era when data had to be stored within the firewall is over. The best applications are now available on the Cloud, and it would be a pity for users to have to consume software the old-fashioned way and not benefit from the latest innovations from independent application vendors. Looking at the economics of Cloud Computing, it’s much more healthy for a...